Have you heard about the default parent? The post went viral recently, and the author #nailedit. Seriously, it’s one of those blog posts that just makes most parents quietly sigh, “Yessss.” Even reading it aloud to my husband last night, he agreed. Every family, we’ve decided, must be functioning like this to some degree – including us. However, M. Blazoned put this much more eloquently than I ever could have. The hubs and I have been talking about this concept a lot lately, before we even stumbled onto this “Default” theory. Except, I have defined two roles in our family: the fun parent and the shit parent. The latter is a noun, not an adjective and should not be confused with “shitty” ... Read the full post.
I was very lucky in my childhood (and now as an adult) to have a really, super-awesome mother. But, I was also unfortunate enough to have a relatively absent father – both by choice when he was alive, and by default after he died. I can’t really say that he was a bad father or a good father, since so much time has passed and the memories I have of him can probably be counted on two hands. And half of which I’m not even sure are real or just some figment of my imagination that has developed so there’s something there to remember. It has been so long, I can’t remember the sound of his voice or his smell or even what he looked like as a real person and not a photograph. But somehow I do remember the coarse roughne ... Read the full post.
Best Dad
Proud Papa! Dear Awesome Husband and Father to My Child, Thanks. I just wanted to take the time to say it because I know you’re grossly misrepresented and under appreciated these days. Society seems to think you’re either the emotionally absent breadwinner or the guy appearing on Maury Povich’s latest dead-beat dad episode, and nothing in between. But I know you’re not an anomaly; there must be more of you out there. If I had a dollar for every time someone has asked me, “how do you do it?!” as a working mom, I’d be rich. If I had another dollar for every time I’ve had to explain, “well, my husband is really great,” to someone looking at me in bewilderment, I’d be even richer ... Read the full post.
I’m just going to come out and say it… In a lot of ways, new Dads have it *gasp* harder than new Moms. Prior to Charlie’s birth, 9 out of 10 respondents polled were uncertain as to how Tristan would adjust to fatherhood. Not that he wouldn’t be a great father, eventually. Just that it would be a big learning curve, given his lack of experience with children, his lack of really ever mentioning wanting/being excited about children, and his lack of anxiety and panic surrounding the fact that we were about to be responsible for another human life. Did I mention he fell asleep in our birth class? Yep. I knew all along that Tristan was destined to be a wonderful father, based solely upon the example set forth for him by hi ... Read the full post.